Monday, October 16, 2017

Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Re: FW: [apela-infos] Disparition de Yambo Ouologuem

Ouologuem plagiarized openly, so to speak. He didn't so much try to hide it—as I would argue beyala did—as transform it, "reterritorialize" it, we would say. if you google it you can see how his famous opening is taken directly and then adapted to le dernier des justes, and I don't remember where else. He setsup the saifs as the villains, and skewers them, famously. Then he is attacked for it; and wrote a really powerful defense of using all published words, regardless of copyright, challenging the notions of private property, copyright. Remember, it was 1968.

Then 20 some odd years later, beyala gets caught plagiarizing. I wrote at length about it, devoting a lot of a chapter onher stealing from dangarembga, but also others. Anyone really interested can find it in my book Less Than One and Double.

She also stole from ben okri, whose published sued her and basically won (her publisher settled), and okri saying it felt as is a bus was running over his legs.

The description you give, Cornelius, is something like the really weak defense she gave—something to the effect that all of us Africans are oral, etc etc. not worth repeating, it was so mealy mouthed.

Both of them are very talented authors. I felt ouologuem was honourable and revolutionary, and that beyala was being dishonest.

As to your question, how can you tell, well it is a matter of judgment. There may be precise laws, but this is another case where reasonable judgment should be applied.

 

I suppose it is ironic to evoke this in our day and age with zillions of pirated movies going around. But that didn't exist in those days.

ken

 

Kenneth Harrow

Dept of English and Film Studies

Michigan State University

619 Red Cedar Rd

East Lansing, MI 48824

517-803-8839

harrow@msu.edu

http://www.english.msu.edu/people/faculty/kenneth-harrow/

 

From: usaafricadialogue <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com> on behalf of Cornelius Hamelberg <corneliushamelberg@gmail.com>
Reply-To: usaafricadialogue <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>
Date: Monday, 16 October 2017 at 18:01
To: usaafricadialogue <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>
Subject: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Re: FW: [apela-infos] Disparition de Yambo Ouologuem

 

It's so sad that some of our greats such as Dick Gregory lately passing us by, quietly on, almost surreptitiously...

 

Many thanks, Professor Kenneth Harrow for bringing the passing of the tragic Yambo Ouologuem  to our attention.

 

Bound to Violence

 

Pdf

A little question to you professor: What happens with what could pass off as quotations from the vast reservoir of the Western -  Eastern Parnassus / heritage when absorbed consciously /unconsciously say in a written stream of consciousness / internal dialogue - such as some of the stuff  from popular song, from Plotinus, Heraclitus or Jesus, a little less common than " love your neighbour as your self" , " I am the resurrection and the life" etc how is the distinction made between what is common and belongs to all of us and  what may be disembowelled and laid out as " plagiarism" ?




On Sunday, 15 October 2017 22:40:18 UTC+2, Kenneth Harrow wrote:

One of africa's most famous early authors has died. Yambo ouologuem, author of Devoir de violence (Bound to Violence). As important a novelist, in the history of african literature, as I know. Devoir came out in 1968, and it was astonishing. The critics did not want to believe an African could write with such style, as so discredited him as a plagiarist. His defense of the plagiarisms was almost as powerful as the novel. His work was part of the revolutionary spirit of the times, not only in his attacks on power—what we'd call colonial, neo-colonial, and postcolonial—but on sexual taboos, and on negritude. Attacks on the veneration of historical figures who were depicted as virtual slave owners. Attacks on a world of privilege, of domination, of corruption—as seen from below, as seen from the perspective of what he termed "la negraille." He was a true man of trash, in the sense of disruption, disturbance, and daring.

 

And then he quit writing. Returned to northern mali, became as religious advocate, and disappeared from view. We need to salute him as one of the signposts of African literature, and remember what he accomplished with the few writings he provided.

Maybe he could be compared with Rimbaud.

If irele were alive, he could tell you all what he meant. I hope others will step into irele's footsteps, and provide their testimonies about him, so that his passing does not occur in silence.

ken

 

Kenneth Harrow

Dept of English and Film Studies

Michigan State University

619 Red Cedar Rd

East Lansing, MI 48824

517-803-8839

harrow@msu.edu

http://www.english.msu.edu/people/faculty/kenneth-harrow/

 

From: <apela-inf...@asso.univ-lorraine.fr> on behalf of Bani Diallo <cnlpd...@gmail.com>
Reply-To: Bani Diallo <cnlpd...@gmail.com>
Date: Sunday, 15 October 2017 at 12:29
To: <apela...@asso.univ-lorraine.fr>
Subject: [apela-infos] Disparition de Yambo Ouologuem

 

Chers membres de l'APELA,

J'ai une triste nouvelle à vous communiquer : Yambo Ouologuem, le premier lauréat africain du Prix Renaudot, s'est éteint dans la nuit du samedi 14 octobre 2017 à Sévaré. 

Que son âme repose en paix !

 

Bien que déinscrit de la liste APELA, pour des raisons d'ordre technique, j'ai tenu à diffuser cette  information, au moment où les obsèques officielles du défunt sont en cours de préparation.   

 

Mamadou Bani Diallo 

Tél. : (223) 76 48 31 29

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USA Africa Dialogue Series - Rising debt: Nigeria heading towards the precipice - The Punch


Rising debt: Nigeria heading towards the precipice

2017-10-17 04:46

By Oludare Mayowa
The Punch


The recent letter from President Muhammadu Buhari to the National Assembly requesting approval to borrow additional $5.5bn from the International Capital Market has brought to the fore the issue of huge debt stock being carried by the country.

In the last two years, Nigeria's debt profile has ballooned astronomically while the debt service has eaten deep into the government's finance to the extent that as a country, we now spend around 60 per cent of our income to service outstanding debts.

As of June this year, Nigeria's external debt stock stood at $15.04bn while the domestic portion stood at $39.33bn.

When combining this with debt profile of the 36 states of the federation, including the Federal Capital Territory, the nation is sure approaching a dangerous threshold in our quest to use debt as a means of developing our broken down infrastructure.

From the look of things, it appears that the government is not yet done in its quest to seek more debt to resolve its budget deficit which has increased in recent times due to a shortfall in revenue earnings from oil and non-oil sources. In its bid to spend its way out of recession, the government has projected to spend more money to build broken down infrastructure, generate employment and improve the ease of doing business in the country.

These are indeed lofty goals for a country that has suffered extreme neglect by successive governments in the time of boom when we should have deployed our then improved incomes from oil export to fast-track development.

Even though Nigeria has exited recession going by the report of the National Bureau of Statistics for the second quarter of the year with GDP growth of 0.55 per cent against the negative growth in the previous five quarters, there is still much to be done to further rejuvenate the economy and improve the standard of living of every Nigerian currently going through suffering and pain.

In his letter to the National Assembly, the President allayed fears that the new debt issuance could further compound the problems of debt stock of the country. Also, some months ago, the finance minister, Kemi Adeosun, told Nigerians that she was making efforts to substitute domestic debt for foreign in a move to cut down on debt servicing cost. All these are simply attempts by the government to justify its rising appetite for debt as a short cut to fund its developmental programme.

What this means is that the government intends to borrow dollar loans to replace existing naira debt. Doing this, the government considers interest rate on external borrowing cheaper than the one on local debt. Therefore, the government plans to refinance about $7tn maturing Treasury bills, which currently carry around 15 per cent interest rate with its equivalent in foreign currency loan that will attract around 7-8 per cent interest thereby cutting down on cost of servicing.

Ordinarily, this is good thinking considering the huge cost the government will be saving on debt service as a result of the reduction in interest rate payment. However, beneath the surface is our dependence largely on crude oil exports for foreign currency earnings with its attendant risk. A sudden shock in the global prices of the commodity could spell doom for the government calculation. Oil price has never remained stable for too long; it has the cycle of boom and bust and any country that usually anchors its economic growth on oil business will always find itself at the wrong side of the stick.

Where we are today as a nation was as a result of our over-reliance on earnings from crude oil, which have not been properly deployed to the benefits of the country. In the time of boom, we were not able to manage our income well enough to provide succour for ourselves in the time of bust. If for whatever reason, the oil price drops further, which is most likely to happen in the near term, the country's ability to service its external loans will become more difficult with the pressure transferred to the common man on the street.

In spite of all efforts being made by the government to increase its income generation through taxation, official data has not shown any significant progress in that line. The state of the economy today has shown that unless the government improves the economic environment, the ability of businesses to employ more hands and even pay tax will continue to be challenged.

In the past three years, many businesses have closed down due to their inability to access foreign exchange and credit at cheap rates, while many are also struggling to survive under the huge burden of poor energy supply, the effect of multiple taxation, and unfavourable government policy.

Particularly, Nigerians are also worried that part of the external loans being sought by the government could end up in the pockets of those in government as corruption remains a major concern to many in spite of noise about war against corruption being waged by the present administration.

Nigerians have yet to feel the impact of the huge borrowing of government on major infrastructure development; the roads are still dilapidated, power supply remains epileptic while standard of living of an average Nigerian is getting worst daily.

Our economy remains fragile even with the claim that we have exited recession; it is very possible that if right policy actions are not put in place, the economy may still slip back to recession.

The problem with our government is that once the price of crude oil drops as we had witnessed since 2014, it starts mouthing diversification of the economy. However, as soon as there is a slight recovery in the global price of oil and we record increase production output, the song changes and all policies that could aid diversification of the economy are put in abeyance while the old order is restored.

The first thing the government should do is to stop its appetite for debt accumulation and look inward to generate more resources from other sources, while using the income from oil to develop the key areas such as agriculture, solid minerals and tourism to boost revenue generation. It should also cut down drastically the cost of governance as a means of reducing the pressure to look for more money to finance its expenditures. From the executive to the legislative arms of government, the country is carrying a huge overhead that it ought not to.

Second, the government should strengthen the law to ensure increased private sector participation in the development of critical infrastructure such as roads, power supply and housing so as to free more resources to take care of other major areas of the economy.

Providing the enabling environment for development should be the focus of the government and the only way this can be done is by improving the quality of rules and regulations governing the business environment; ensure the enforcement of existing laws and eradicate corruption, impunity and nepotism.

Private investment will always thrive where the rule of law is rigorously enforced and government policies are predictable for the sake of long term planning and stability.

Government could successfully attract investment into the power sector and even the constructions of road infrastructure provided due process is followed and it is ready to honour agreements.

The government should not drag the nation back to the pre-2004 era, when debt burden almost sank the ship of our nascent democracy. If the government must borrow, this should be done sparingly and efforts should be made to ensure that such debts are properly deployed to fund projects that can regenerate themselves without further burdening the suffering Nigerian masses.

–Mayowa is a Lagos-based International financial journalist

USA Africa Dialogue Series - Re: [africanworldforum] Re: Buhari belongs to northerners, S’West regrets voting for him – Adebanjo



My People:


Read the Goebellsian irrendistt Igbo supermenschen exemplar Reginald Marinus Obiefuna Olufemi Nwakanma write:

QUOTE

Until the Igbo return spiritually to Nigeria, it will continue to be a wasteland. That is the real Igbo challenge. We just dey look una as you keep going to the well until you smash all your calabashes. Then you will rise as one, and in a great cry of anguish, plead with the Igbo to right things. That day is coming, Ayo. That's all I should say here.


UNQUOTE

Lord have mercy!

Honestly, you are an ENEMY of your Igbo people when you write like this, to the reading eyes of others.  I don't think that that there is ANY  other writer,  sans a Nazi, who would write so chillingly and boastfully like this,  in ANY political entity with so many other ethnic groups, like you have written.  If one did not know that you REALLY exist, one would think that you are DELIBERATELY inviting opprobrium to the Igbo people, under the guise of truth-telling.  Zik your god was far wiser, even if also a little suspect (See his "Manifest Destiny" speech below.")

But you are probably convinced of what you write - and that is a tragedy - to you and to the Igbo that you say that you word-smith for.  

And there you have it.



Bolaji Aluko




Nnamdi Azikiwe's "Address to Ndiigbo" at the Igbo State Assembly, Aba in 1949

In the following address given eleven years before Nigerian independence, Nnamdi Azikiwe calls for self-determination for the Igbo as they, along with other ethnic groups, march toward an inevitably free Nigeria.  This address was delivered at the Igbo State Assembly held at Aba, Nigeria, on Saturday, June 25, 1949.

Harbingers of a new day for the Igbo nation, having selected me to preside over the deliberations of this assembly of the Igbo nation, I am conscious of the fact that you have not done so because of any extraordinary attributes in me. I realize that I am not the oldest among you, nor the wisest, nor the wealthiest, nor the most experienced, nor the most learned. I am, therefore, grateful to you for elevating me to this high pedestal.

The Igbo people have reached a crossroad and it is for us to decide which is the right course to follow. We are confronted with routes leading to diverse goals, but as I see it, there is only one road that I can safely recommend for us to tread, and it is the road to self-determination for the Igbo within the framework of a federated commonwealth of Nigeria and the Cameroons, leading to a United States of Africa. Other roads, in my opinion, are calculated to lead us astray from the path of national self-realization.

It would appear that God has specially created the Igbo people to suffer persecution and be victimized because of their resolute will to live. Since suffering is the label of our tribe, we can afford to be sacrificed for the ultimate redemption of the children of Africa. Is it not fortunate that the Igbo are among the few remnants of indigenous African nations who are still not spoliated by the artificial niceties of Western materialism? Is it not historically significant that throughout the glorious history of Africa, the Igbo is one of the select few to have escaped the humiliation of a conqueror's sword or to be a victim of a Carthaginian treaty? Search through the records of African history and you will fail to find an occasion when, in any pitched battle, any African nation has either marched across Igbo territory or subjected the Igbo nation to a humiliating conquest. Instead, there is record to show that the martial prowess of the Igbo, at all stages of human history, has rivaled them not only to survive persecution, but also to adapt themselves to the role thus thrust upon them by history, of preserving all that is best and most noble in African culture and tradition. Placed in this high estate, the Igbo cannot shirk the responsibility conferred on it by its manifest destiny. Having undergone a course of suffering, the Igbo must, therefore, enter into its heritage by asserting its birthright, without apologies.

Follow me in a kaleidoscopic study of the Igbo. Four million strong in manpower! Our agricultural resources include economic and food crops which are the bases of modern civilization, not to mention fruits and vegetables which flourish in the tropics! Our mineral resources include coal, lignite, lead, antimony, iron, diatomite, clay, oil, tin! Our forest products include timber of economic value, including iroko and mahogany! Our fauna and flora are marvels of the world! Our land is blessed by waterways of world renown, including the River Niger, Imo River, Cross River! Our ports are among the best known in the continent of Africa. Yet in spite of these natural advantages, which illustrate without doubt the potential wealth of the Igbo, we are among the least developed in Nigeria, economically, and we are so ostracized socially, that we have become extraneous in the political institutions of Nigeria.

I have not come here today in order to catalogue the disabilities which the Igbo suffer, in spite of our potential wealth, in spite of our teeming manpower, in spite of our vitality as an indigenous African people; suffice it to say that it would enable you to appreciate the manifest destiny of the Igbo if I enumerated some of the acts of discrimination against us as a people. Socially, the British Press has not been sparing in describing us as 'the most hated in Nigeria'. In this unholy crusade, the Daily Mirror, The Times, The Economist, News Review and the Daily Mail have been in the forefront. In the Nigerian Press, you are living witnesses of what has happened in the last eighteen months, when Lagos, Zaria and Calabar sections of the Nigerian Press were virtually encouraged to provoke us to tendentious propaganda. It is needless for me to tell you that today, both in England and in West Africa, the expression 'Igbo' has become a word of opprobrium.

Politically, you have seen with your own eyes how four million people were disenfranchised by the British, for decades, because of our alleged backwardness. We have never been represented on the Executive Council, and not one Igbo town has had the franchise, despite the fact that our native political institutions are essentially democratic – in fact, more democratic than any other nation in Africa, in spite of our extreme individualism.

Economically, we have labored under onerous taxation measures, without receiving sufficient social amenities to justify them. We have been taxed without representation, and our contributions in taxes have been used to develop other areas, out of proportion to the incidence of taxation in those areas. It would seem that we are becoming a victim of economic annihilation through a gradual but studied process. What are my reasons for cataloguing these disabilities and interpreting them as calculated to emasculate us, and so render us impotent to assert our right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness?

I shall now state the facts which should be well known to any honest student of Nigerian history. On the social plane, it will be found that outside of Government College at Umuahia, there is no other secondary school run by the British Government in Nigeria in Igboland. There is not one secondary school for girls run by the British Government in our part of the country. In the Northern and Western Provinces, the contrary is the case. If a survey of the hospital facilities in Igboland were made, embarrassing results might show some sort of discrimination. Outside of Port Harcourt, fire protection is not provided in any Igbo town. And yet, we have been under the protection of Great Britain for many decades!

On the economic plane, I cannot sufficiently impress you because you are too familiar with the victimization which is our fate. Look at our roads; how many of them are tarred, compared, for example, with the roads in other parts of the country? Those of you who have travelled to this assembly by road are witnesses of the corrugated and utterly unworthy state of the roads which traverse Igboland, in spite of the fact that four million Igbo people pay taxes in order, among others, to have good roads. With roads, must be considered the system of communications, water and electricity supplies. How many of our towns, for example, have complete postal, telegraph, telephone and wireless services, compared to towns in other areas of Nigeria? How many have pipe-borne water supplies? How many have electricity undertakings? Does not the Igbo taxpayer fulfill his civic duty? Why, then, must he be a victim of studied official victimization?

Today, these disabilities have been intensified. There is a movement to disregard traditional organization in the Igbo nation by the introduction of a specious system of a form of local government. The placing of the Igbo nation in an artificial regionalization scheme has left an unfair impression of attempted domination by minorities of the Igbo people. In the House of Assembly and the Legislative Council, the electoral college system has aided in the complete disenfranchisement of the Igbo. As a climax, spurious leadership is being foisted upon us – a mis-leadership which receives official recognition, thus stultifying the legitimate aspirations of the Igbo. This leadership shows a palpable disloyalty to the Igbo and loyalty to an alien protecting power.

The only worthwhile stand we can make as a nation is to assert our right to self-determination, as a unit of a prospective Federal Commonwealth of Nigeria and the Cameroons, where our rights will be respected and safeguarded. Roughly speaking, there are twenty main dialectal regions in the Igbo nation, which can be conveniently departmentalized as Provinces of an Igbo State, to wit: Mbammili in the northwest, Aniocha in the west, Anidinma and Ukwuani in the southeast, Nsukka and Udi in the north, Awgu, Awka and Onitsha in the center, Ogbaru in the south, Abakaliki and Afikpo in the northwest, Okigwi, Orlu, Owerri and Mbaise in the east, Ngwa, Bende, Abiriba Ohafia and Etche in the southwest. These Provinces can have their territorial boundaries delimited, they can select their capitals, and then can conveniently develop their resources both for their common benefit and for those of the other nationalities who make up this great country called Nigeria and the Cameroons.

The keynote in this address is self-determination for the Igbo. Let us establish an Igbo State, based on linguistic and ethnic factors, enabling us to take our place side by side with the other linguistic and ethnic groups which make up Nigeria and the Cameroons. With the Hausa, Fulani, Kanuri, Yoruba, Ibibio (Igboku), Angus (Bi-Rom), Tiv, Ijaw, Edo, Urhobo, ltsekiri, Nupe, Igalla, Ogaja, Gwari, Duala, Bali and other nationalities asserting their right to self-determination each as separate as the fingers, but united with others as a part of the same hand, we can reclaim Nigeria and the Cameroons from this degradation which it has pleased the forces of European imperialism to impose upon us. Therefore, our meeting today is of momentous importance in the history of the Igbo, in that opportunity has been presented to us to heed the call of a despoiled race, to answer the summons to redeem a ravished continent, to rally forces to the defense of a humiliated country, and to arouse national consciousness in a demoralized but dynamic nation.




On Tue, Oct 17, 2017 at 3:04 AM, Rex Marinus <rexmarinus@hotmail.com> wrote:

Ayo, I'm actually quite no longer in the mood for this discussion because frankly you do not bring anything fresh to it. You do not even know what a "union government" is. A union government is not a "temporary arrangement." it is about the NATURE of the CENTRAL government in relation to affiliate or federating states. I could go on and on and give you insight into Azikiwe's political philosophy based on his writings and propositions, but it would be like casting rubies to sows. And so Ayo, believe what you want: what is clear is very simple  though, and history will bear this witness of Zik and Ironsi: they were the examples of the nobility of the Igbo spirit - they chose to sacrifice themselves for the greater national good. We do hope that Nigeria survives, and as history is often written in the tranche of a hundred years, in spite of the current revisionist agenda of your faction of the Yoruba, history will record that Awo was a felon, was a fascist and tribalist, and that his faction of the Yoruba were reactionaries and revanchists who practiced and propagated the African version of the Nazi national socialism, and that the great greed for power spiraled into that lurch of madness called "the wild, wild west," which later led to events that destroyed the early foundations of Nigeria as a nation-state. You can erect all the statues you want of him today, whitewash AND lionize him all you want, but the children of tomorrow will piss on that image, because the history books of the nation are already open, and try all the revision you can, the voice that would be heard down the ages would be that of the historian Tekena Tamuno, who wrote unambiguously: "the Igbo are the makers of modern Nigeria. When they left Nigeria collapsed...  ." Until the Igbo return spiritually to Nigeria, it will continue to be a wasteland. That is the real Igbo challenge. We just dey look una as you keep going to the well until you smash all your calabashes. Then you will rise as one, and in a great cry of anguish, plead with the Igbo to right things. That day is coming, Ayo. That's all I should say here.

Obi Nwakanma





From: Ayo Ojutalayo <ayoojutalayo@yahoo.com>
Sent: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 12:22 AM
To: rexmarinus@hotmail.com; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; NaijaPolitics@yahoogroups.com; Igbo Events; igboworldforum@yahoogroups.com; africanworldforum@googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: [africanworldforum] Re: Buhari belongs to northerners, S'West regrets voting for him – Adebanjo
 
Obi,

Stop confusing yourself. "Union government" is not a political system. Google "system of government in India" and you will see federation. Union government is a temporary arrangement put in place for exigency. It is put in place in whatever political system is in place (unitary or federal). Zik, Aguyi Ironsi and Igbo wanted unitary system for selfish reasons. Turning Nigeria unitary was Ironsi's first major act as Head of State. And he did it at the advice/counsel of Igbo politicians. Northerners said the act confirmed Igbo's plan to dominate.

Your long stories in which you repeat falsehood cannot change Nigeria's history. With Igbos like you, Nigerians (especially Southerners) will continue to be suspecious of Igbo because you are not ready to take responsibility for Igbo's role in getting Nigeria to the chaos Nigeria is in: Zik's choice to be a ceremonial President (in Northern People's Congress' majority government) instead of being Prime Minister in his NCNC majority government - with Awo's AG), the Igbo coup and the civil war (which was Igbo taking up arms to settle political disagreement with Northerners).

Zik was the first in Nigeria to voluntarily foist a Northerner on Nigeria as political leader. Zik with PhD preferred working under Prime Minister Balewa with Teachers Training Certificate, to being Prime Minister himself with Barrister Awolowo as one of his Ministers. We know how Zik's choice worked out for Nigeria.

Ayo Ojutalayo


On Mon, Oct 16, 2017 at 8:35 AM, Rex Marinus
<rexmarinus@hotmail.com> wrote:"No where in the world has unitary system worked in a multi ethnic country like Nigeria. That is why it has not worked in Nigeria."
-Ayo Ojutalayo

Wrong again, Ojutalayo. Please get your historical facts: Azikiwe did not propose a unitary state. He proposed a "Union government" such as we still have in India. There is a material difference, and if you are versed in constitutional law and constitutionalism, you'd understand that difference. Zik was a constitutionalist. He wanted the establishment of Nigeria as a democratic republic. India was as a good a model as any. The descent of Nigeria into chaos began with the unraveling of the Action Group Party. Having campaigned vigorously to form the government of the Nigerian state, and having relied on promises made to him by his British handlers, Awo was sourly dissapointed at the outcome of the 1959 elections. The Nationalist Party, the NCNC polled the highest nation-wide voters; the regionalist NPC polled almost neck to neck with the Action Group Party, which was just beginning, by 1958 to position itself outside of a mostly Western Nigerian regional party in preparations for the December 1959 elections.

The NPC had threatened to secede from Nigeria if the Southern parties were to form the national government, and the North itself had been gerrymandered by British colonial interests to provide half the number of seats in the House of Representatives. During that 1959 election, NCNC coalition partners in the north, the popular NEPU led by Mallam Aminu was suppressed, its candidates refused election forms before deadlines; various parts where they sought to contest declared "unopposed." Had the elections been free in the North, the NCNC which was still the most widely influential party nation-wide and the NEPU would have formed the first national government without needing a coalition partner. But as far back as 1953, it was clear the British despaired of that scenario from declassified empire documents now available, and made their own plans to make certain that the Nationalists did not come to power. The threat of the North to secede was one critical move prompting Azikiwe's famous letter to the Northern leaders warning them against the consequences of secession.

There were three factors that compelled Zik's choice of the NPC: one, was the internal dynamic of his own party. The western Nigerian committee of the NCNC vowed to exit the party should the National committee decide to work with the Action Group. The Eastern Nigerian party committee were all for working with AG, but Awolowo's kinsmen in the NCNC refused to work in a coalition with him. The threat to dismember the party should the NCNC work with AG was a serious enough threat that Zik acceded. Secondly, the internal dynamics within the AG itself was beginning to point towards a serious crisis. Zik and the NCNC had weathered their own crisis in 1958, but the AG at the end of that election was afloat. A section of the party wanted to work with the NPC, or at best, be party to a national unity government as was in existence from 1957, to secure at the very least, Yoruba stake in the new national government. Awo and a faction were adamant against working with the North, whom they had absolute disregard for. It was Awo's serious disregard and hatred of the North, particularly the Sarduana, that made him decide against even considering a third-party coalition. The result was that, the NCNC, understanding that it would be irresponsible of a nationalist party to leave the power to form the new, critical government of a new nation in the hands of a revanchist and unprepared NPC, chose to enter that coalition as a way of giving Nigeria a small chance of survival. Awo chose to lead opposition from parliament which is alright for a parliamentary democracy. Every good thing that was achieved in that first republic were NCNC programs - from the expansions in public education, to the establishment of the National Provident Fund, the expansion of National Railways network, and the framework of the Ist National Economic Development plan crafted by Okigbo whom Balewa took from the East to be his Economic adviser. It is arguable that Nigeria saw a great momentum in that period, although the political framework collapsed. The third factor was the urging by Nkrumah in his letter to Zik, to make the kind of personal sacrifice that would make Nigeria survive, for the sake of the African continent, and forestall what they anticipated was the British "neocolonial agenda" which was already at play.

In the end, because it was outside of power, the Action Group imploded, and it took with it, the west. First, two factions emerged from the AG fissure. One of those factions, led by Akintola blamed Awo for the decision against joining a national unity government, and attempting rather to ursurp the powers of the elected Premier of the west. They fought to the death. Second, Awo's disdain for Balewa's government moved him and his faction in 1960/61 to begin to make plans for a coup, which was discovered, and they were jailed for it. That was the beginning of the Nigerian chaos. The "restless" west or the "wild west" had collapsed. It was in the effort to save it that compelled the January 1966 coup. We need to be clear on this. The consequences of the January 15 coup, led to the civil war. The Civil war may not have happened had the West asserted the agreement reached in Enugu between Ojukwu and Awo, to establish a common "Southern Front" and compel the North either to accede to negotiations, or secede. Awo and the west betrayed that agreement, and rather, joined in the war against the East for clearly two reasons (a) to secure the then clearly incredible resources of the East for its own use, and (b) to upstage Easterners in the competition for ascendancy in Nigeria. Zik warned seriously about all these moves. And when it came to the crunch, his deft international moves led to the end of the war. That again is the legacy of Zik. Let these facts speak for themselves, and not the colored shebeen narratives that you all are used to from seeping too frequently of the koolaid at Risikatu's Bar by the Ogunpa.
Obi Nwakanma

 




From: Ayo Ojutalayo <ayoojutalayo@yahoo.com>
Sent: Monday, October 16, 2017 5:44 AM
To: NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; NaijaPolitics@yahoogroups.com; Igbo Events; igboworldforum@yahoogroups.com; africanworldforum@googlegroups.com; Rex Marinus
Subject: Re: [africanworldforum] Re: Buhari belongs to northerners, S'West regrets voting for him – Adebanjo
 
"If Zik had a greed with Awo, there would have been no Nigeria to speak of!" . . . . . Obi Nwakanma

You cannot eat your cake and have it. Zik's choice of NPC instead of AG, and the Igbo coup of January 15, 1966 are the begining of the "chaos that is Nigeria today".  The coup "trashed" the Constitution we now claim is the way out of the chaos. There would have been no need for the January 15 coup but for Zik's choice. And there would not have been no biafra war and all the coups that followed if there was no January 15, 1966 Igbo coup. By the way, your "Zik's idea of nation" was a unitary system instead of a federal system. That was Aguyi Ironsi's idea too. In actual fact, it was Igbo's idea of a nation because unlike Yoruba, Igbo wanted to take advantage of the less educated Northern Nigerian (with shortages of man power). No where in the world has unitary system worked in a multi ethnic country like Nigeria. That is why it has not worked in Nigeria.

And if there was going to be fragmantation of Nigeria, it would have been done by the politicians without war.


Ayo Ojutalayo


"The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. " . . . Martin Luther King Jr


On Sunday, October 15, 2017, 8:34:48 PM EDT, Rex Marinus <rexmarinus@hotmail.com> wrote:



If Zik had a greed with Awo, there would have been no Nigeria to speak of! It was the decision of a man who placed nation, above self. That's the true meaning of nobility and patriotism. Zik was not about personal power and agrandizement, he was all about the cohesion of nation in an era of decolonization. His offer remained the most viable: the formation of a tripartite coalition government for a transitional government of "national unity." Awo and a faction of his party refused, and thus the AG party crisis that snowballed into a national crisis. That is Nigerian history.
Obi Nwakanma



From: 'ayoojuts@yahoo.com' via AfricanWorldForum <africanworldforum@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, October 15, 2017 8:11 PM
To: NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; africanworldforum@googlegroups.com; NIgerianWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; NaijaPolitics@yahoogroups.com; Igbo Events; igboworldforum@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [africanworldforum] Re: Buhari belongs to northerners, S'West regrets voting for him – Adebanjo
 
If Zik had agreed with Awo for a Zik led NCNC-AG government after independence, Nigeria would not be where it is today.

Ayo Ojutalayo


On Sun, Oct 15, 2017 at 2:35 PM, Rex Marinus rexmarinus@hotmail.com [NIgerianWorldForum]
 

The chaos that is Nigeria today is because the ideas of Awo and the Sarduana became dominant and triumphant as Nigeria's national ethos: it is the heritage of fascism, tribalism, intolerance,  extremism, xenophobia, and ethnic irrendentism. Awo and Bello were created by the British to subvert and undermine the nationalist movement. We continue to suffer from that colonial legacy and the fear of the "true Nigerian nationalist" - those who saw every Nigerian from every part as human, as citizens, and as the rightful inheritors of nation. Nigerians suffer today because Zik's idea of nation was defeated. Yes indeed, a man born in the west, could, under Azikiwe's nationalist movement, be the premier of the East, if he lived, grew, and worked in the East. That is why Solomon Akenzua could become Permanent Secretary in the Eastern regional Service in 1954 under Zik's premiership. That is why A.K. Disu, would be the powerful General Manager of the Eastern Nigerian Information Service and principal Adviser to the Premier of Eastern Nigeria (basically one of the most powerful people in the government of the Eastern region), and then longtime Principal Secretary to the President of Nigeria; that is how come Umaru Altine became the Mayor of the city of Enugu; etc. etc. That is why a minority could become the first head of government in the East - the only region in Nigeria where that might be possible. That is in fact why Zik chose to represent Lagos, and that is why from 1951 - 1957, he was the most influential politician in Lagos, and while he remained, Awo  never won election in cosmopolitan Lagos.


Nigeria today is the basic product of those who campaigned, and fought Zik and insisted on "the north for the north, the west for the west, and the center for us all." In other words, to keep the primordial boundaries of ethnicity and regionalism, while Zik and his Igbo compatriots were campaigning and sacrificing for an ideal pan-Nigerian nationhood, because, of course, it was in their best interest, this idea of a Nigerian state. Now that Zik's idea has lost out, Nigeria has descended into chaos. The Igbo today blame him for being "more Nigerian than Igbo," and most have now rejected what Azikiwe stood for: a pan-African, pan-Nigerian humanism, for a very narrow Igbo nationalism that has now bought into Awo and Sarduana's message that all must stay and fight in their corner of Nigeria. The Igbo now say, "whatever did Zik's idea and defence of Nigeria gain for us?" The withdrawal of the Igbo from the Nigerian idea is now the basis of the Nigerian crisis because, no one now believes in Nigeria. The only nationality that believed in, and fiercely defended the idea of Nigeria has now said, well, we cannot be the only ones who can be more Nigerian than everybody else, and they have taken the path of difference. That is why Nigeria cannot survive: the idea that you are first an Igbo man before being a Nigeria, and not Zik's idea that you can be Nigerian and Igbo or Yoruba, or Hausa, or Akan, or Saro, or Bachama, without contradiction. The idea of Nigeria as a coherent, single nation no longer has its greatest defenders - the Igbo: they have bought into the mantra of radical difference. So, Nigeria fails because there is no Zik to unify it. There is no visionary impetus of the kind that Zikism gave to Nigeria; that made it seem possible in a particular generation; that gave it the ideological lift, and that shaped the consciousness of the age of Zik in Nigeria; there is no one left with the kind of charismatic energy or force - that super-human capacity to draw people to a single idea - that Zik embodied, and that could calm the current of friction. There is no more Zik to pull Nigeria from the brink. The decline of Zikism is the end of Nigeria, and the rise of fragmentation is the triumph of Awo and Sarduana, and so be it! This is what this bumbkin, Eniola Dumpling cannot comprehend. No sense of history.


The great Yoruba advocates and followers of Zikism - H.O. Davies, T.O.S Bee, Ade Ogunsanya, Coker, Fred Macewen, Odumbaku, "Penklemes," Olu Akinfosile, A.K. Disu, Kola Balogun, M. Otun, Raji Abdallah, and so many more, who always delivered between 48%  and 51% of the Yoruba votes to Zik puts a lie to his claims, because that half the great Yoruba people of Nigeria, the enlightened and wise ones, always loved and voted Zik, and actually gave him their mandate. That mandate was stolen in 1951. It is this half of the Yoruba, and the half of the North who also always loved the idea of Zik - liberty, fraternity, equality, progress, freedom and prosperity for Nigerians without boundaries - that the great Igbo people of Nigeria must ally with and restore the nation, and give it the "renascent" promise that Zikism held. Zik's party, the NCNC won the elections nation-wide in 1960, polling more than half a million votes above its closest rival, but was gerrymandered out of power by the British colonial interests who had threatened the survival of Nigeria as a common nation if the nationalists formed a government. As a compromise for the sake of the nation, Zik and his party agreed to enter a coalition government with one of the British Trojan Horses, just simply as to "get the bull out of the China shop." They did not reckon with the immense size of that bull. But whatever else anybody would say, Zik led Nigeria out of colonialism. And that is his true legacy. Whatever else was the shape of the postcolonial state is now to be determined by his followers - all those who understood that Zikism is about freedom, equality, liberty, and a pan-Nigerian humanism.

Obi Nwakanma

 




From: 'DIPO ENIOLA' via AfricanWorldForum <africanworldforum@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, October 15, 2017 5:07 PM
To: vincent modebelu; africanworldforum@googlegroups.com; Yahoo! Inc..; The Cable; Rex Gomes; OBSERVE YOURSELF; Dandalin siyasa; ezeana1@yahoo.com; thecableng; TheCitizen; Stevek; thegistnews@ymail.com; thepublicexpress@yahoo.com; AfricanWorldForum@yahoogroups.com; peter opara; thinklillies@gmail.com; thenigerianvoice.com; Thenationonlineng Info; The Eagle Online; The Gazelle News.com; THE NATION NEWSPAPER; the Sun Newspaper; DIPO ENIOLA dipoeniola@yahoo.com [NaijaObserver]
Subject: Re: [africanworldforum] ||NaijaObserver|| Buhari belongs to northerners, S'West regrets voting for him – Adebanjo [2 Attachments]
 
Vin Modebelu of Ndi Olumbe:

Get real! Azikiwe to become Premier of Western
Region?  No way! Could you imagine a situation whereby a Yoruba man would become the premier of Northern  or Eastern Nigeria during that time? Almost 50 years later citizens of one state in SE cannot become even an elected official in another. 

Part of the problem of Nigerians is that we are not willing to tell the truth. You want a citizen emerging from the yoke of external colonialism to subsumed their interests to internal colonialism? God forbid. More so, when Zik was going around the East saying that "it's a matter of time before Igbo people dominate the affairs of Nigeria." 

I am grateful today that the tribalist Zik was not allowed to usurp power because of the generosity of the Great Yoruba people of the Southwest.  To allow that to happen would have been a political malpractice on the part of Yoruba leaders.

The Oha 1
Ahu Nze Ebie Okwu

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

On Sunday, October 15, 2017, 11:20 AM, vincent modebelu <vin_modebelu@yahoo.com> wrote:

DJ

Chei 

You just pick the worst examples you could find ?

 Chief Nnamdi Azikiwe 
Awowlwo worked against him, Did not want him to be the Premier of west and he ended up as the Presiden..better than the best
to Dr. Ekwueme 
It was Abiola who planned and Financed the coup that took out Ekwueme and Shagari to Prevent Ekwueme from being the President.
It was the 1st Babangida buhari coup
to Odimegwu Ojukwu 
 It was awowlwo who sent the Obas to than the emirs for not killing yoruba. It was also the same Awowlow that took the job from Gowan and bback stabbed IGBo and he was later fired from that job

to Arthur Ezeribe, 
It was Abiola who refused to pay Arthur Nzeribe after a Huge loan to Abiola. Abiola died in jail because of that loan. He used the monies to buy arms against Biafra during the war. So Arthur Nzeribe has to get even.

The who is who of Yoruba has consistently acted against IGBo their mentors.
Yoruba has bad records with IGBO in Nigeria

Do not give IGBO a chance in Nigeria politics...Oooni
Shoot Igbo on sight...Adekunle
Starve igbo to death......Bola Ige
Confiscate all their monies....Sam aluko
Sell off the lands and properties...Awolwowo
Fashola tried to deport IGBO from Lagos

With the advent of Fayose, these will soon change.

We are still standing.

Yoruba is now on the receiving end of DanFodio deceits and methods.

We are here to help


  
http://umuahiaibeku.com/Thepic2.jpg

From Chief Nnamdi Azikiwe to Dr. Ekwueme to Odimegwu Ojukwu to Arthur Ezeribe, 


vin.....///

On Sunday, October 15, 2017, 10:50:25 AM EDT, DIPO ENIOLA dipoeniola@yahoo.com [NaijaObserver] <NaijaObserver@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


Vin Modebelu of Ndi Olumbe: 


You are  just being dishonest. Igbo people have cooperated and worked with Hausa and Fulani far more than Yoruba. From Chief Nnamdi Azikiwe to Dr. Ekwueme to Odimegwu Ojukwu to Arthur Ezeribe, etc., they have done it all.  It is true that Igbo people have NOT gotten any appreciable rewards for their slave work to Hausa and Fulani. But Yoruba people with far less cooperation appear to have gotten more than the Igbo people. 

Does it mean that The Great Yoruba people are much smarter? It seems so. 

The Oha 1
Ahu Nze Ebie Okwu


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

On Sunday, October 15, 2017, 10:24 AM, 'vincent modebelu' via AfricanWorldForum <africanworldforum@googlegroups.com> wrote:

He He heeeeeee

IGBo does not take chances with those people but Yoruba keeps hedging with them.  

It has never paid off and will never pay off


they know what they are doing that makes them keep making the same mistakes..Will do it again 2019 ..hoping to collect again without IGBO.

One renegade Yoruba told me it was a smart constructive opposition to checkmate IGBO
  
Side story to this events

Hausa + Fulani knows that Yoruba wants to collect with out IGBO as they did during the war.

But.....

Hausa + Fulani is handling Yoruba worse that a run away girls looking for a hand out but now wants to make demands on his master and tries to blackmail him.

Throw the girl out into the street in Mushin.

Yoruba cannot come to IGBo to complain...
Yoruba cannot blackmail Hausa + Fulani.

What are they going to do now/

Go back to the master and be a good girls and take it ?

remember..this is the Awoist talking...it is now hurting to the bones

http://umuahiaibeku.com/Thepic2.jpg

All the South-West governors are in support of restructuring but they are afraid of the dictatorial tendency of this present administration. We had a conference in Ibadan recently; all the governors contributed morally and financially. They couldn't come but they sent their deputies


 The greatest mistake made was for Yoruba to vote for Buhari. The South-West is regretting voting for Buhari. Tinubu is regretting now – he and his supporters are now regretting helping Buhari to become the president



vin.....///

Buhari belongs to northerners, S'West regrets voting for him – Adebanjo





A close associate of Chief Obafemi Awolowo and an elder statesman, Chief Ayo Adebanjo, in this interview with BAYO AKINLOYE talks about what President Muhammadu Buhari needs to do to save the country from collapse and the role of Chief Bola Tinubu in the current state of the economy

What's your reaction to the revelation by the World Bank Group boss that President Muhammadu Buhari directed the financial institution to carry out more of its developmental projects in northern Nigeria?

The disclosure of the President of the World Bank Group only confirmed what I have been saying that President Muhammadu Buhari is president of the North and not president of Nigeria. It is unfortunate that even the international community is also aware of this nepotism – of Buhari's unbridled desire to favour a section of the country to the detriment of the others. Is it only the North that is devastated? What about the Niger Delta region? What exactly has been done to salvage the area? He should focus on productive areas to engender development in the country. Buhari's body language, words and actions show he is president of the North. Only those who are gullible will accept what his mouthpieces are saying – it's mere damage control.

You will notice of late that while the world is doing the best they can to shift their economic focus away from crude oil, the current administration of Buhari is doing the opposite. Despite repeated calls by economic experts, both local and foreign experts, that Nigeria should diversify its economy and be less dependent on oil, Buhari has continued to spend the country's meager money in our treasury for oil exploration in the North – he is wasting our money. Everything that Buhari has done so far since he assumed office as president shows where he belongs to. It is apparent he belongs to nobody but the northerners – he does not belong to everybody in this country. He turns a blind eye to everything happening outside the northern region.

He has confirmed all the fears I had expressed about him. He has presided over a country that is insecure and has demonstrated intolerance. He claimed to be a born-again democrat when he was contesting the presidency. Buhari will not bother to restructure the country because his people are the beneficiaries of the lopsidedness in the country. Buhari only sent the 2014 National Conference report to the National Assembly because he was pressured to do so. He has no interest to restructure. The confusion Buhari and APC are creating about restructuring shows that they are taking the people for granted. How can they be asking what restructuring is? It was made as part of their manifesto. The APC is doing all it can to confuse the people.

They shouldn't tell us Nigeria's unity isn't negotiable. The unity is negotiable and we negotiated it in 1954 and that happened when there was a crisis in the House when (Anthony) Enahoro moved the motion and the Western Region withdrew its cabinet and the federal cabinet was disrupted, leading to the colonial rulers to send for the leaders of the party. We went to London, Lancanster House, and there, the unity of the country was negotiated and the principle of federalism was agreed upon and confirmed in the constitution that came up thereafter – when each of the regions back then had its own constitution. It is that constitution we had in 1962/93 when the country became a republic. Our problem began with the constitution foisted on us in 1966 by the military. Then in 1999, the military gave us another constitution that does not represent the will of the people. We protested against it. Nnamdi Kanu is called a terrorist today because he wants justice for his people. The military put us where we are today. I am a Kanu man; where I don't agree with him is the use of force.

Are you saying Buhari is part of the country's problem?

Yes, he is. Anybody opposed to restructuring is the greatest enemy of Nigeria's unity. All the South-West governors are in support of restructuring but they are afraid of the dictatorial tendency of this present administration. We had a conference in Ibadan recently; all the governors contributed morally and financially. They couldn't come but they sent their deputies. If Buhari is honest and interested in the unity of this country, why didn't he have a dialogue with Nnamdi Kanu? Buhari will not listen to the voice of reason because he has an element of force in him. If Buhari is honest, why didn't he call for a dialogue? Why are people agitating for a secession? It is because the government has refused to restructure.

Do you think APC national leader, Bola Tinubu, made a mistake helping Buhari to become the president?

It is not a question of a mistake. I warned Tinubu against supporting Buhari ahead of the 2015 presidential election. What is for Tinubu in this government? He has been sidelined. This government is all about Buhari. The greatest mistake made was for Yoruba to vote for Buhari. The South-West is regretting voting for Buhari. Tinubu is regretting now – he and his supporters are now regretting helping Buhari to become the president. It is Tinubu and all his supporters you should be asking: 'Are you regretting you helped to bring Buhari to power or you're happy with his administration?' The problem that Yoruba and Nigerians have today was caused by Tinubu. If Tinubu had not gone into an alliance with Buhari, would we be in this position? Tinubu is the cause of Yoruba's suffering now. He is the cause of Nigerians' suffering now. He helped a dictator to come to power in the person of Buhari, knowing that he's a born dictator; an unrepentant conservative and an irredeemable religious jingoist. What has he done in his life that does not show he's a dictator? By birth and by training, he's a dictator – go and check his past records as a military head of state.

When I campaigned against him before the election, people accused me of collecting money from (ex-President Goodluck) Jonathan. I am one of those who fought for Nigeria's independence and I am not a happy man with the way this country is being run. If Buhari does not restructure Nigeria, this country will break (up) and I am not afraid to be prosecuted if they regard that as hate speech. Buhari wants to shut down the opposition completely; that's why he branded Kanu a terrorist. Buhari is running the country the way he likes because he has all the instruments of force in his hand. All the military top brass are northern Muslims – I said 'northern Muslims'; I didn't say 'northerners'.

Does that have anything to do with the current military operations in the three southern regions of the country?

The ongoing military operations – Operation Crocodile Smile and Operation Python Dance – are designed to militarise the country. In every civilian situation, the military is there. Question: when did the military take over the police's job in a civilian regime? Similarly, where the military is absent, the Fulani armed militia are present – they are all over the country committing all sorts of crimes like raping, kidnapping and killing. What has Buhari said about the violent acts of those people? Another question: since when did rearing cattle with AK-47 become fashionable? I want Buhari and his co-travellers to answer these questions. Why is he hesitating to ban the herdsmen from carrying arms? Is he honest? The same Buhari was quick to label Kanu and other members of the Indigenous People of Biafra terrorists. Is this the country whose unity they are saying is not negotiable, where criminals are allowed to roam the country and agitators are being crucified? The Buhari government wants us to keep quiet as if nothing is happening. I want to tell Buhari that this is not the state we were in when we got independence in 1960. We will neither abandon this country nor succumb to any Fulani domination.

How should the restructuring of the country be done?

Who is in this country that has not supported the restructuring of Nigeria? It is only Buhari. Many responsible and credible Nigerians have expressed their support for the restructuring of Nigeria.

What about former President Olusegun Obasanjo?

Obasanjo is the only exception. The restructuring we are clamouring for is not a strange word at all. It is another way of saying, 'Let us go back to where we came from – to the 1960 and 1963 constitutions.' Why should it be a problem to resist the constitution foisted on us by the military? Nobody is talking about unity; we are already united. It is this government that is putting in a condition of disunity – this is what the Soviet Union did and failed and it is the same thing that Czechoslovakia did and failed. You can't keep people forcefully together under a unitary government; they will break (apart) eventually. To save the country, we came together in 2014 by means of the national conference, but Buhari said he has thrown the report of that confab somewhere and he is not going to look at it. Buhari believes he has all the forces of enslavement. But I want to assure him that the South and the Middle Belt will rely on God to destroy the forces of Buhari. Buhari is confusing Nigerians; he and his party, the APC, are confusing the country. They are doing things that are unacceptable to the majority of the people. Buhari should be told that he is the president of Nigeria and not the president of Katsina. If he is the president of Nigeria and not the president of Katsina, he should embark on the restructuring of the country immediately.

He must let the country be restructured before any election if he is sincere. If a marriage is successful, will anybody seek divorce in that marriage? But when you have serious disaffection in a marriage, things will no longer be at ease. We know what we fought for to attain independence. Our togetherness was settled upon attaining independence. What we have now was forced on us by the military. If Buhari truly loves this country and is sincere about keeping it together, he will make a name for himself by going back to the 1960 constitution – then, I can heartily tell him, 'Welcome to the democratic fold.' The Buhari administration should stop the fake news they are spreading around that those calling for the restructuring of Nigeria want the country to break up – that is an evil propaganda. On the contrary, those against the restructuring of the country are the people who really want the country to break up.

Buhari belongs to northerners, S'West regrets voting for him – Adebanjo



 Observe and see



On Sunday, October 15, 2017, 10:50:25 AM EDT, DIPO ENIOLA dipoeniola@yahoo.com [NaijaObserver] <NaijaObserver@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


 

Vin Modebelu of Ndi Olumbe: 


You are  just being dishonest. Igbo people have cooperated and worked with Hausa and Fulani far more than Yoruba. From Chief Nnamdi Azikiwe to Dr. Ekwueme to Odimegwu Ojukwu to Arthur Ezeribe, etc., they have done it all.  It is true that Igbo people have NOT gotten any appreciable rewards for their slave work to Hausa and Fulani. But Yoruba people with far less cooperation appear to have gotten more than the Igbo people. 

Does it mean that The Great Yoruba people are much smarter? It seems so. 

The Oha 1
Ahu Nze Ebie Okwu


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

On Sunday, October 15, 2017, 10:24 AM, 'vincent modebelu' via AfricanWorldForum <africanworldforum@googlegroups.com> wrote:

He He heeeeeee

IGBo does not take chances with those people but Yoruba keeps hedging with them.  

It has never paid off and will never pay off


they know what they are doing that makes them keep making the same mistakes..Will do it again 2019 ..hoping to collect again without IGBO.

One renegade Yoruba told me it was a smart constructive opposition to checkmate IGBO
  
Side story to this events

Hausa + Fulani knows that Yoruba wants to collect with out IGBO as they did during the war.

But.....

Hausa + Fulani is handling Yoruba worse that a run away girls looking for a hand out but now wants to make demands on his master and tries to blackmail him.

Throw the girl out into the street in Mushin.

Yoruba cannot come to IGBo to complain...
Yoruba cannot blackmail Hausa + Fulani.

What are they going to do now/

Go back to the master and be a good girls and take it ?

remember..this is the Awoist talking...it is now hurting to the bones

http://umuahiaibeku.com/Thepic2.jpg

All the South-West governors are in support of restructuring but they are afraid of the dictatorial tendency of this present administration. We had a conference in Ibadan recently; all the governors contributed morally and financially. They couldn't come but they sent their deputies


 The greatest mistake made was for Yoruba to vote for Buhari. The South-West is regretting voting for Buhari. Tinubu is regretting now – he and his supporters are now regretting helping Buhari to become the president



vin.....///

Buhari belongs to northerners, S'West regrets voting for him – Adebanjo





A close associate of Chief Obafemi Awolowo and an elder statesman, Chief Ayo Adebanjo, in this interview with BAYO AKINLOYE talks about what President Muhammadu Buhari needs to do to save the country from collapse and the role of Chief Bola Tinubu in the current state of the economy

What's your reaction to the revelation by the World Bank Group boss that President Muhammadu Buhari directed the financial institution to carry out more of its developmental projects in northern Nigeria?

The disclosure of the President of the World Bank Group only confirmed what I have been saying that President Muhammadu Buhari is president of the North and not president of Nigeria. It is unfortunate that even the international community is also aware of this nepotism – of Buhari's unbridled desire to favour a section of the country to the detriment of the others. Is it only the North that is devastated? What about the Niger Delta region? What exactly has been done to salvage the area? He should focus on productive areas to engender development in the country. Buhari's body language, words and actions show he is president of the North. Only those who are gullible will accept what his mouthpieces are saying – it's mere damage control.

You will notice of late that while the world is doing the best they can to shift their economic focus away from crude oil, the current administration of Buhari is doing the opposite. Despite repeated calls by economic experts, both local and foreign experts, that Nigeria should diversify its economy and be less dependent on oil, Buhari has continued to spend the country's meager money in our treasury for oil exploration in the North – he is wasting our money. Everything that Buhari has done so far since he assumed office as president shows where he belongs to. It is apparent he belongs to nobody but the northerners – he does not belong to everybody in this country. He turns a blind eye to everything happening outside the northern region.

He has confirmed all the fears I had expressed about him. He has presided over a country that is insecure and has demonstrated intolerance. He claimed to be a born-again democrat when he was contesting the presidency. Buhari will not bother to restructure the country because his people are the beneficiaries of the lopsidedness in the country. Buhari only sent the 2014 National Conference report to the National Assembly because he was pressured to do so. He has no interest to restructure. The confusion Buhari and APC are creating about restructuring shows that they are taking the people for granted. How can they be asking what restructuring is? It was made as part of their manifesto. The APC is doing all it can to confuse the people.

They shouldn't tell us Nigeria's unity isn't negotiable. The unity is negotiable and we negotiated it in 1954 and that happened when there was a crisis in the House when (Anthony) Enahoro moved the motion and the Western Region withdrew its cabinet and the federal cabinet was disrupted, leading to the colonial rulers to send for the leaders of the party. We went to London, Lancanster House, and there, the unity of the country was negotiated and the principle of federalism was agreed upon and confirmed in the constitution that came up thereafter – when each of the regions back then had its own constitution. It is that constitution we had in 1962/93 when the country became a republic. Our problem began with the constitution foisted on us in 1966 by the military. Then in 1999, the military gave us another constitution that does not represent the will of the people. We protested against it. Nnamdi Kanu is called a terrorist today because he wants justice for his people. The military put us where we are today. I am a Kanu man; where I don't agree with him is the use of force.

Are you saying Buhari is part of the country's problem?

Yes, he is. Anybody opposed to restructuring is the greatest enemy of Nigeria's unity. All the South-West governors are in support of restructuring but they are afraid of the dictatorial tendency of this present administration. We had a conference in Ibadan recently; all the governors contributed morally and financially. They couldn't come but they sent their deputies. If Buhari is honest and interested in the unity of this country, why didn't he have a dialogue with Nnamdi Kanu? Buhari will not listen to the voice of reason because he has an element of force in him. If Buhari is honest, why didn't he call for a dialogue? Why are people agitating for a secession? It is because the government has refused to restructure.

Do you think APC national leader, Bola Tinubu, made a mistake helping Buhari to become the president?

It is not a question of a mistake. I warned Tinubu against supporting Buhari ahead of the 2015 presidential election. What is for Tinubu in this government? He has been sidelined. This government is all about Buhari. The greatest mistake made was for Yoruba to vote for Buhari. The South-West is regretting voting for Buhari. Tinubu is regretting now – he and his supporters are now regretting helping Buhari to become the president. It is Tinubu and all his supporters you should be asking: 'Are you regretting you helped to bring Buhari to power or you're happy with his administration?' The problem that Yoruba and Nigerians have today was caused by Tinubu. If Tinubu had not gone into an alliance with Buhari, would we be in this position? Tinubu is the cause of Yoruba's suffering now. He is the cause of Nigerians' suffering now. He helped a dictator to come to power in the person of Buhari, knowing that he's a born dictator; an unrepentant conservative and an irredeemable religious jingoist. What has he done in his life that does not show he's a dictator? By birth and by training, he's a dictator – go and check his past records as a military head of state.

When I campaigned against him before the election, people accused me of collecting money from (ex-President Goodluck) Jonathan. I am one of those who fought for Nigeria's independence and I am not a happy man with the way this country is being run. If Buhari does not restructure Nigeria, this country will break (up) and I am not afraid to be prosecuted if they regard that as hate speech. Buhari wants to shut down the opposition completely; that's why he branded Kanu a terrorist. Buhari is running the country the way he likes because he has all the instruments of force in his hand. All the military top brass are northern Muslims – I said 'northern Muslims'; I didn't say 'northerners'.

Does that have anything to do with the current military operations in the three southern regions of the country?

The ongoing military operations – Operation Crocodile Smile and Operation Python Dance – are designed to militarise the country. In every civilian situation, the military is there. Question: when did the military take over the police's job in a civilian regime? Similarly, where the military is absent, the Fulani armed militia are present – they are all over the country committing all sorts of crimes like raping, kidnapping and killing. What has Buhari said about the violent acts of those people? Another question: since when did rearing cattle with AK-47 become fashionable? I want Buhari and his co-travellers to answer these questions. Why is he hesitating to ban the herdsmen from carrying arms? Is he honest? The same Buhari was quick to label Kanu and other members of the Indigenous People of Biafra terrorists. Is this the country whose unity they are saying is not negotiable, where criminals are allowed to roam the country and agitators are being crucified? The Buhari government wants us to keep quiet as if nothing is happening. I want to tell Buhari that this is not the state we were in when we got independence in 1960. We will neither abandon this country nor succumb to any Fulani domination.

How should the restructuring of the country be done?

Who is in this country that has not supported the restructuring of Nigeria? It is only Buhari. Many responsible and credible Nigerians have expressed their support for the restructuring of Nigeria.

What about former President Olusegun Obasanjo?

Obasanjo is the only exception. The restructuring we are clamouring for is not a strange word at all. It is another way of saying, 'Let us go back to where we came from – to the 1960 and 1963 constitutions.' Why should it be a problem to resist the constitution foisted on us by the military? Nobody is talking about unity; we are already united. It is this government that is putting in a condition of disunity – this is what the Soviet Union did and failed and it is the same thing that Czechoslovakia did and failed. You can't keep people forcefully together under a unitary government; they will break (apart) eventually. To save the country, we came together in 2014 by means of the national conference, but Buhari said he has thrown the report of that confab somewhere and he is not going to look at it. Buhari believes he has all the forces of enslavement. But I want to assure him that the South and the Middle Belt will rely on God to destroy the forces of Buhari. Buhari is confusing Nigerians; he and his party, the APC, are confusing the country. They are doing things that are unacceptable to the majority of the people. Buhari should be told that he is the president of Nigeria and not the president of Katsina. If he is the president of Nigeria and not the president of Katsina, he should embark on the restructuring of the country immediately.

He must let the country be restructured before any election if he is sincere. If a marriage is successful, will anybody seek divorce in that marriage? But when you have serious disaffection in a marriage, things will no longer be at ease. We know what we fought for to attain independence. Our togetherness was settled upon attaining independence. What we have now was forced on us by the military. If Buhari truly loves this country and is sincere about keeping it together, he will make a name for himself by going back to the 1960 constitution – then, I can heartily tell him, 'Welcome to the democratic fold.' The Buhari administration should stop the fake news they are spreading around that those calling for the restructuring of Nigeria want the country to break up – that is an evil propaganda. On the contrary, those against the restructuring of the country are the people who really want the country to break up.

Buhari belongs to northerners, S'West regrets voting for him – Adebanjo




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